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Information Literacy Resources

Guide for faculty

Outcome 1.4.3

Write an annotated bibliography that (a) critically analyzes the context, relevance, and authority of information sources, particularly in light of new perspectives, additional voices, and changes in schools of thought.


The annotated bibliography brings in the evaluation and use portions of the information literacy objectives.  It allows the students to analyze and synthesize the information resources they found.

Annotated bibliographies typically contain:

  • Summary: summarizes the content of the resource in the student's own words. 
  • Evaluation: evaluates the context, authority, and credibility of the information given, comparing/contrasting to new perspectives, diverse voices, and popular schools of thought
  • Reflection: reflecting on the relevance and usefulness to the source to the research question

Evaluation

There are several methods that can be used to evaluate information, including:

New and Diverse Voices

The Association of College and Research Libraries notes that it is important for scholarly researchers and writers to "understand how and why some individuals or groups of individuals may be underrepresented or systematically marginalized within the systems that produce and disseminate information." Scholars can lift up these underrepresented and marginalized voices by intentionally seeking them out and including them in their work.  Find more on this at the Anti-Racism Resources Guide from Forsyth Library. 

Example Annotated Bibliography Rubric from UNIV 301

 

 

Not Proficient Developing Proficiency Proficient Exceeding Proficiency

Write an annotated bibliography that (a) critically analyzes the context, relevance, and authority of information sources, particularly in light of new perspectives, additional voices, and changes in schools of thought.

 

 

Sources and Annotations do not summarize sources clearly, and/or annotations are plagiarized

Sources and Annotations include at least 2 to the following:

A) Summarize sources but are less clear about the important ideas. Many quotes or paraphrasing are used

B) Include a limited analyses of the context of the sources

C) Do not clearly articulate how sources relate to the topic and/or why those sources were chosen

D) Use irrelevant or inaccurate information to address source authority and/or credibility.  Few sources cited can be considered reliable and/or trustworthy

E) Include a limited awareness of other viewpoints, diverse voices, influences, and/or schools of thought

Sources and Annotations include all of the following:

A) Clearly summarize the important ideas, data, and/ or results of each source. Few quotes or paraphrasing are used

B) Clearly include an analyses of the context of the sources, (e.g. author, publisher, date and/or place of creation, the purpose of creation, publishing format and/or potential biases)

C) Clearly articulate how sources relate to the topic and why they selected as a source

D) Clearly address source authority and/or credibility by discussing expertise, but may not sufficiently relate expertise to the particular topic.  Majority of sources cited can be considered reliable and/or trustworthy

E) Clearly include other viewpoints, diverse voices, influences, and/or schools of thought

Sources and Annotations show a deeper analysis, including, but not limited to:

A) Clearly summarize the important ideas, data, and/ or results of each source. No quotes or paraphrasing are used, summaries are in their own words

B) Clearly include a deeper analyses of the context of the sources, such as external factors that may have influenced the initial creation of the source and the work’s impact on the discipline and society at large, both at the time of publication and after

C)  Clearly articulate how sources relate to the topic, each other, and the larger body of work and/or scholarship in the field or discipline

D)   Clearly addresses authority and credibility by examining how author expertise affects their qualifications to write on a specific topic.  All sources cited can be considered reliable and/or trustworthy

E) Clearly include a rich diversity of viewpoints, voices, influences, and/or schools of thought

If inspired by this rubric, please acknowledge the work done by Forsyth Library for the UNIV 301 Information Literacy course in your documentation. 

Example Annotated Bibliography assignment from UNIV 301

Annotated Bibliographies can be assignments that stand on their own, such as in UNIV 301, or be part of other scholarly projects, such as:

  • Scholarly papers
  • Original research findings
  • Literature reviews
  • Scholarly posters
  • Presentations
  • Speeches

If inspired by this assignment, please acknowledge the work done by Forsyth Library for the UNIV 301 Information Literacy course in your documentation.

Teaching Resources for Evaluation and Annotated Bibliography