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Information Literacy Resources

Guide for faculty

Outcome 1.4.1

Design a research plan that:

     b. Identifies appropriate information resources;

This outcome has the student looking to the future- explaining through the research question what they want to know, and mapping out a research plan for where and how they intend to look for information resources. 

 

A Research Plan is a document of where and how the student plans to look for information resources. There is no standard format for plans, and students may find that their plans and their actual searching differ. A plan is a future-looking document, a sort of road-map to the types of information, sources, and finding tools they predict will help them find appropriate information resources. Think of it as planning a vacation itinerary, but knowing you may decide to visit the museum instead of the beach once you get to your destination. 

Each plan will be unique to the discipline, course, assignment, and research question, but in general, should include:

Types of Information needed, such as:

  • primary sources
  • secondary sources
  • tertiary sources
  • original data sets
  • qualitative information
  • quantitative information

Sources of Information to search for, such as:

  • monographs
  • books
  • reference works
  • periodical articles
  • peer-reviewed articles
  • trade articles
  • news
  • popular and sensational works
  • archival materials
  • conference proceedings
  • expert interviews
  • grey literature
  • media, images, videos

Finding Tools to use when searching, such as:

  • Forsyth Library catalog
  • Specific scholarly databases (e.g. Education Source, CINAHL, PyschArticles, ArtStor)
  • Specific web resources (Congress.gov, Pew Research.org)
  • Institutional repositories
  • Governments repositories
  • Archives
  • Open access databases

A Note:

Many instructors default to requiring students to find only peer-reviewed scholarly articles. Forsyth Library encourages you to reflect on this requirement, and if it fits the needs of your assignment and discipline. In some cases, sources such as basic reference information, primary source artifacts, or public opinion may be the best fit for the information need. A source's authority depends on multiple factors, unique to the context of the need, not just on the traditional peer-reviewed model. Contact your Forsyth Library Liaison to consult about what required sources fit your assignment best. 

Example Information Resources Rubric from UNIV 301

 

 

 

Not Proficient Developing Proficiency Proficient Exceeding Proficiency

Design a research plan that (b) identifies appropriate information resources.

 

 

Identifies information resources that are appropriate to the information need, including 0-1 of the following:

A) Types of information

B) Sources of information

C) Finding tools to search for information

Identifies information resources that are appropriate to the information need, including at least 2 of the following:

A) Types of information

B) Sources of information

C) Finding tools to search for information

Identifies information resources that are appropriate to the information need, including all of the following:

A) Types of information (e.g. primary/secondary sources and qualitative/quantitative information)

B) Sources of information (e.g. monographs, reference works, and periodical articles, and scholarly, peer-reviewed, trade, news, and sensational works)

C) Specifically-named finding tools to search for information (e.g. specific academic library catalogs, scholarly databases, and web resources)

Shows a deeper understanding of appropriate information needed for the information need, but not limited to:

A) Types of information (e.g. tertiary sources or original data sets)

B) Sources of information (e.g. archival materials, conference proceedings, expert interviews, and grey literature).

C) Specifically-named specialized or discipline-specific finding tools (e.g. institutional and government repositories, archives, and open access databases/resources)

If inspired by this rubric, please acknowledge the work done by Forsyth Library for the UNIV 301 Information Literacy course in your documentation. 

Example Research Plan Assignment from UNIV 301

In UNIV 301 Information Literacy, after each of the first six modules, students add to their research plan, applying what they learned to their topic and research question. The work is reviewed and graded at each stage to allow instructor feedback and revision. The entire plan is later turned in as a whole for FHSU CORE assessment. 

If inspired by this assignment, please acknowledge the work done by Forsyth Library for the UNIV 301 Information Literacy course in your documentation. 

Teaching Resources for Information Resources