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ART 101 & 102 (Schmierbach): General Information

This guide is for both ART 101 Drawing I,  and ART 102, Drawing II,  sections taught by Amy Schmierbach. It provides specific resource suggestions for the artist presentation assignment, and how to find them online and in Forsyth Library. 

Welcome

Welcome. This guide is for both ART 101 Drawing I,  and ART 102, Drawing II,  sections taught by Amy Schmierbach. It provides specific resource suggestions for the artist presentation assignment, and how to find them online and in Forsyth Library. 

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Get started with a quick search of the catalog and multiple databases.
Search for magazine, newspaper, and scholarly journal articles.
Search Digital Archives to find digitized photos, FHSU theses, yearbooks, and more.
Search Books & More to find books & e-books, print & e-journals, DVDs, CDs, government documents, & more.

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Information Resources

Books on bookshelves CC0 Public Domain via Pixabay

How do I find books in Forsyth Library?

  • Start at Forsyth's website: http://www.fhsu.edu/library/
  • Use the Search Everything search bar to search for your title, keywords, or subject area. You can also use the Search Box on the left.

Forsyth Library webpage Search Everything box

  • A search for Van Gogh finds over 35,000 results
  • To narrow this down, use the sidebar and choose Books, and Available in the Library and/or any other choices for your search
  • Click on Details on an item to learn more about it
  • Click on Get It to see item availability and location, including the call number, such as General Collection, Top Floor, 
  •  NC263 .G56 A4 2005 ​

How are Books & Journals organized in Forsyth Library? 

Forsyth Library uses the Library of Congress Classification System for it's books and journals. Items are organized by subject, starting with broad topic areas and getting more specific, so like items will usually be shelved together.

Where can I browse books on Education and related topics?

Education topics can be in several places in the system. Here are some ideas for browsing, but always check the online catalog to direct you to a specific item.

For example:

  • N is the section for Fine Arts
    • NC is the subsection for Drawing
      • NC730-758 is a subsection for Technique

 

Image of text on an e-reader

How do I find E-books in Forsyth Library?

  • Start at Forsyth's website: http://www.fhsu.edu/library/
  • Use the Search Everything search bar to search for your title, keywords, or subject area. You can also use the Search Box on the left.

Forsyth Library webpage Search Everything Box

 

  • A search for Van Gogh finds over 35,000 results
  • To narrow this down, use the sidebar and choose Full Text Online and Books, and/or any choices for your search
  • Click on Details on an item to learn more about it
  • Click on View It to see the full text or to select the E-book database that has the item

E-books come in many forms at Forsyth Library.

  • Some e-books are checked out to just one person at a time, just like a physical book
  • Some e-books are checked out to multiple people at a time
  • Some e-books have a limited number of uses before they become unavailable
  • Some e-books can be used over and over again
  • Some e-books can be downloaded and read on your personal device
  • Some e-books can only be read in your browser window
  • Some e-books limit how many pages you can print or save from the book

These factors depend on how, and from whom, Forsyth Library purchased the e-book.  If you have trouble accessing an e-book, please Ask Us for help, and we will try to resolve it for you as quickly as possible.

Best Databases for Art

Hand holding a magnifying glass, looking for facts on a computer screen CC0 Public Domain  via Pixabay

MLA Citation Help

Basic format:                         Last Name, First Name. Title of Book. Publisher, Publication Date.

One Author:                            Gleick, James. Chaos: Making a New Science. Penguin, 1987.

More than One Author:           Gillespie, Paula, and Neal Lerner. The Allyn and Bacon Guide to Peer Tutoring. Allyn and Bacon, 2000.

Corporate Author:                    American Allergy Association. Allergies in Children. Random House, 1998.

No Author:                                Encyclopedia of Indiana. Somerset, 1993.

Edition of a Book:                    Crowley, Sharon, and Debra Hawhee. Ancient Rhetorics for Contemporary Students. 3rd ed., Pearson, 2004.

Anthology with Editors                Hill, Charles A., and Marguerite Helmers, editors. Defining Visual Rhetorics. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2004.

Article in Ref. Book                     "Ideology." The American Heritage Dictionary. 3rd ed., 1997

Basic Format:                     

Last Name, First Name, Title of Article. Journal Title, volume, issue, Publication date, pp. page numbers. Databasepermalink or DOI.

Asafu-Adjaye, Prince. “Private Returns on Education in Ghana: Estimating the Effects of Education on Employability in Ghana.” African Sociological Review, vol. 16, no. 1, 2012, pp. 120-138. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/24487691.

Basic Format:

Author:

Last Name, First Name. "Title of posting." Name of Website, Day Month Year Published, URL. 

White, Lori. “The Newest Fad in People Helping People: Little Free Pantries.” Upworthy, Cloud Tiger Media, 3 Aug. 2016,
www.upworthy.com/the-newest-fad-in-people-helping-people-little-free-pantries?g=2&c=hpstream.

 

No Author:

"Title", Name of website, URL.

“Giant Panda.” Smithsonian National Zoological Park, Smithsonian Institute, nationalzoo.si.edu/animals/giantpandas/pandafacts.

Website or print, includes paintings, sculptures, or photography

Basic Format:

Artist Last Name, First Name. Name of Art . (Date of creation). Institution, city where art is housed. Name of Website, URL. 

Wood, Grant. American Gothic. (1930). The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago.  The Art Institute of Chicago, http://www.artic.edu/aic/collections/artwork/6565​