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Social Work

A comprehensive guide to researching, evaluating and citing information on Social Work. Topics include using databases, APA style, avoiding plagiarism and using Interlibrary Loan.

Avoiding Plagiarism Video

This video discusses plagiarism and how to avoid it when using and citing resources, including:

How to Embed This Tutorial in Blackboard:

  1. Select and copy (Ctrl+C) all of the following Embed Code text:
    <iframe title="Plagiarism Orientation Video" width="640" height="360" allowTransparency="true" mozallowfullscreen webkitallowfullscreen allowfullscreen style="background-color:transparent;" frameBorder="0" src="https://app.vidgrid.com/embed/yxNEMD3rlzxC"></iframe>
  2. In Blackboard, create and name an Item (or any other Blackboard tool that includes the standard Text Editor) 
  3. Click the HTML button at the bottom right of the Tool Buttons to open the HTML editor 
  4. Paste (Ctrl+V) the embed code within the HTML window and click Update and Submit. 

Link to VidGrid Video: https://use.vg/MLW3cN

Who Me? Plagiarize?

Surprised Little BoyYou may be plagiarising without realizing it.  Plagiarism isn't only obvious theft such as buying a paper off the web or copying and pasting entire papers.  Failing to properly cite the source of the words and ideas you use in your paper also constitutes plagiarism. 

Plagiarism is theft of someone's words or ideas.  "Plagiarism is pretending that an idea is yours when in fact you found it in a source.  You can therefore be guilty of plagiarism even if you thoroughly rewrite the source's words.  One of the goals of education is to help you work with and credit the ideas of others.  When you use another's idea, whether from a book, a lecture, a Web page, a friend's paper, or any other source, and whether you quote the words or restate the idea in your own words, you must give that person credit with a citation." Harris, Robert A.  Appendix. The Plagiarism Handbook:  Strategies for Preventing, Detecting, and Dealing with Plagiarism. Pyrczak Publishing:  Los Angeles, California,  2001. 132-133.

photo credit: Robbie Grubbs via photopin cc